Jean-Luc Godard, Daring Director Who Shaped the French New Wave, Dies at 91Jean-Luc Godard, Daring Director Who Shaped the French New Wave, Dies at 91

Jean-Luc Godard, the Ambitious Director Who Shaped the French New Wave, Dies at the age of 91.


Jean-Luc Godard, the daringly innovative director and provocateur whose unconventional camera work, disjointed narrative style and penchant for radical politics changed the course of filmmaking in the 1960s, leaving a lasting influence on it, has died. He was 91.Jean-Luc Godard, the daringly innovative director and provocateur whose unconventional camera work, disjointed narrative style and penchant for radical politics changed the course of filmmaking in the 1960s, leaving a lasting influence on it, has died. He was 91.
This innovative director and narrative style producer, changed the course of filmmaking in the 1960s, leaving an everlasting influence in the industry.
The French President, Emmanuel Macron confirmed Mr. Godard’s death in a statement on social media on Tuesday, refering Jean-Luc Godard as the “most iconoclastic” of New Wave filmmakers.
Source : The New York Times
As a young critic in the 1950s, Mr. Godard was one of several iconoclastic writers who helped turn a new publication called "Cinema Book" into a critical force that swept away the old guard of the European art cinema and replaced it with new heroes largely drawn from the ranks of the American commercial cinema directors like Alfred Hitchcock and Howard Hawks.
Jean-Luc Godard was born in Dec, 3, 1930, in Paris. He is the second of four children in an extravagantly wealthy Protestant family.
Born Into Wealth
Source : Asia Times
His father, Paul-Jean Godard, became a Swiss citizen and opened a clinic in Nyon, Switzerland. Jean-Luc spent his early childhood in Switzeland, visiting his family’s estates on both the French and Swiss sides of Lake Geneva and remaining there until the end of World War II.
After some personal struggles during his childhood, Jean-Luc Godard's mother secured a job for him with a Swiss television, but things didn't end well for both the employer and Jean-luc. In 1952, he landed in jail in Zurich.
A Masterpiece With ‘Contempt’
In 1963, the Italian producer Carlo Ponti offered Mr. Godard a hefty budget and the services of Brigitte Bardot, then at the height of her international popularity, to create a film version of the Alberto Moravia novel “Il Disprezzo.” The resulting film was “Contempt”.
In February 1968, things started changing in the movie industry, especially when Mr. Godard, alongside with several New Wave colleagues, stepped forward to protest the decision of the French minister of culture at the time, "André Malraux", to force "Henri Langlois" to resign as chief of the French Cinematheque, the film archive that Mr. Langlois found in 1936.
After a pair of aggressively didactic films like, “Un Film Comme les Autres”, “Le Gai Savoir”, and an abortive project with the Rolling Stones, released against Mr. Godard’s wishes called “Sympathy for the Devil”, Mr. Godard collaborated with the filmmaker Jean-Pierre Gorin to create a collective named the "Dziga Vertov Group", after the Soviet filmmaker they much admired.
As he grew older, Mr. Godard seemed more intolerant with other film directors. Especially toward "Steven Spielberg".
Despite his personal flaws and the fact that few of his movies found a global mainstream audience, Mr. Godard was, and still is, an important influence for filmmakers.